Enterprise headlines and summaries, 2009-04-28

  • Microsoft Introduces Major ERP and CRM Incentive Offerings
    Furthering an ongoing commitment to help businesses thrive in today’s economy, Microsoft Corp. today introduced three major incentive offerings. The first is Business Ready Flexible Pay, which gives new Microsoft Dynamics ERP and CRM customers in the U.S. the option to purchase the solutions today but pay for them in equal payments over three years…While other vendors have significantly raised their maintenance fees over the past year, Microsoft has not only held its enhancement rates steady, but has also launched a number of money-saving offers… Second,…a 50 percent discount on licensing, and receive a rebate equal to 25 percent of the suggested retail price of the Microsoft Dynamics solution…from Sage MAS 90 or MAS 200, or Oracle’s JD Edwards EnterpriseOne. … Third,…now Microsoft Dynamics CRM can be purchased as a stand-alone product from Business Ready Licensing.
  • Business Ready Flexible Pay for Microsoft Dynamics
    • Get affordable and predictable payments Manage cash flow and control costs with predictable payments over three years, resulting in ownership of the Microsoft Dynamics software licenses. • Realize rapid return on investment Align software expenses with the long-term benefits of your Microsoft Dynamics solution, resulting in rapid return on your investment up front. • Increase productivity today Start using a Microsoft Dynamics solution today to increase productivity. Also, enjoy access to the Business Ready Enhancement Plan which provides the tools and resources you need – product information, downloads, self-support resources, training and more – to keep your users working efficiently.
  • Oracle Committed to Sun’s Hardware Business
    The company has a strong track record with acquisitions. Since 2005, Oracle has spent about $30 billion on acquisitions that have fueled both top-line and earnings growth. Oracle’s track record does bode well for the company as it makes a push to become a serious player in the hardware space. Oracle believes customers will want to buy high-end servers from the same company that makes the software running on them, a model that’s been successful for competitor IBM, which sells both servers and the software applications.
  • H-1B Visa Law: Trying Once Again
    The bill would not reduce the number of H-1B visas — now 85,000 per year — but contains provisions to increase oversight and enforcement and discourage outsourcing of H-1B visa holders. It also requires all employers seeking to hire an H-1B visa holder to pledge that they have made a “good faith” effort to hire American workers first.
  • Sun Microsystems expected to post 3Q loss
    ANALYST OPINION: Some analysts are concerned about what happens to Sun’s different divisions under Oracle, particularly hardware, but most agree that a sale was the only way for Sun to improve its finances. Thomas Weisel Partners analyst Doug Reid called the deal an “escape hatch” that will likely close in the summer as scheduled – since there are fewer potential antitrust issues than a tie-up with IBM – and will make Sun more efficient and competitive. While Sun’s standalone numbers are still expected to fall in the third quarter, Reid says Sun, once incorporated into Oracle, will be able to leverage Oracle’s brand to become more effective against Hewlett-Packard Co. ( HPQ – news – people ) in servers and “gain a slightly larger share of wallet within existing Oracle accounts.”
  • Imagine Where Microsoft Would Be If It Had The Discipline of Oracle
    Now, contrast that with Microsoft. Ballmer doesn’t know what the company is about. Is it focused on the desktop, games, internet, enterprise? Who knows? He doesn’t have a coherent vision of where all these markets are going. Who could? As a result, Ballmer doesn’t have a coherent strategy. He’s attempting to do everything; and he’s doing nothing well. Seriously, does anyone have a clue what Ballmer will do next, and why? If you say you do, you’re lying. You can’t know, because there is no strategy. There’s just a bunch of incoherent initiatives. It’s too bad, because if Microsoft had been as focused as Oracle, they could be hugely dominant in the enterprise space. As it is, they’ve wasted ten years.
  • The SAP/Teradata deal explained
    Just to be clear — I still don’t see this as a big deal. It doesn’t portend any grand SAP/Teradata joint mission to smite Oracle, IBM, and/or Microsoft. Nor is it a telling first step toward an SAP/Teradata merger. It just removes a particular competitive disadvantage Teradata had vs. Oracle et al., from which Teradata’s smaller specialist competitors still suffer. And it offers SAP BW customers another high-quality DBMS option.
  • Marc the software slayer’s new mission
    “It’s time for The End of Maintenance.” Salesforce is now going after the maintenance fees that the software industry has long charged for updates and bug fixes. With such costs ranging from 20 percent to 25 percent of the original price of the software, Benioff points out that means customers are paying for their software all over again every four or five years. For Salesforce and “software as a service” peers like NetSuite, Workday, SuccessFactors and RightNow, they don’t charge charge maintenance fees as all costs are included in subscription fees.
  • America’s Cup – It’s back to Court we go
    Societe Nautique de Geneve is the Defender of the America’s Cup, and was required in a decision of 7 April by the Appeal Court, to accept the Challenger in a 90ft yacht, lodged on 11 July 2007. At the first meeting of the Challenger and Defender last week, SNG announced that they were planning to stage the Match in May 2010, in apparent contravention of a New York Supreme Court Order stipulating that the Match should take place in three months earlier in early February 2010. It has been rather obvious since the Appeal Court decision in early April, that SNG has been playing for time in meeting the US challenger, and has a number of ploys underway to achieve this end. … ‘SNG/Alinghi also announced that they would Defend in May 2010, and apparent contravention of a New York Supreme Court order requiring a match to be sailed on 8 February 2010.
  • Sun Microsystems lost $201 million last quarter, better than analysts had expected
    But the loss was not as bad as some analysts had expected. Sun said the loss amounted to 27 cents per share, or 7 cents per share after excluding certain one-time charges. Analysts polled by Thomson Reuters had forecast a net loss of 18 cents per share, excluding one-time charges, on revenue of $2.9 billion.
  • Satyam, Tech Mahindra set to have $2.2 bn revenue
    Satyam Computer Services and its new owner Tech Mahindra are set to have combined revenues in the range of around $ 2.2 billion. While an immediate merger is ruled out, the two companies may be integrated two or three years down the line to have one large Tech Mahindra, a top Tech Mahindra official told employees at the “Tech Mahindra All Hands Meet Conference” last week.
  • CIO Salaries Rise, But Bonuses Slip
    According to more than 400 respondents, CIOs’ average salaries are $193,000 in 2009, a slight increase from the 2008 average of $188,000. Last year saw the biggest year-over-year jump in salaries, with a 17 percent increase over 2007’s average of $161,000. Average bonuses slipped in 2009 ($33,000) from 2008 ($46,000), dropping total average compensation for 2009 to $226,000 from the 2008 total of $234,000.
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