Enterprise headlines and summaries, 2009-03-10

  • Scoreboard: The highest and lowest rated leaders in tech
    Highly-rated Steve Jobs, Apple: Approval: 90%, Company Rating: 3.8 Eric Schmidt, Google: Approval: 88%, Company Rating: 4.0 John Chambers, Cisco: Approval: 78%, Company Rating: 3.6 Mark Benioff, Salesforce.com: Approval: 73%, Company Rating: 3.7 Jim Balsillie, RIM: Approval: 70%, Company Rating: 3.8 Larry Ellison, Oracle: Approval: 63%, Company Rating: 3.2 Paul Otellini, Intel: Approval: 62%, Company Rating: 3.5 Poorly-rated Michael Dell, Dell: Approval: 48%, Company Rating: 3.0 Steve Ballmer, Microsoft: Approval: 44%, Company Rating: 3.7 Sam Palmisano, IBM: Approval: 42%, Company Rating: 3.2 Mark Hurd, Hewlett-Packard: Approval: 41%, Company Rating: 2.8 Ed Colligan, Palm: Approval: 36%, Company Rating: 3.2 Jonathan Schwartz, Sun Microsystems: Approval: 25%, Company Rating: 3.1 Greg Brown, Motorola: Approval: 10%, Company Rating: 2.6
  • RDBMS license costs and Open Source
    All three of the big guys (Oracle, IBM, and Sybase) follow the same basic sales model: 1. publish nominal list pricing only; 2. obfuscate package names, functionality, discounts, and prerequisites to the point that no customer can reasonably understand what’s where; 3. frown severely on anyone who even thinks about publishing pricing, performance, and/or functional information; and, 4. give the sales crew lots of leeway in dealing with customers who pass credit check.
  • Complex Event Processing Startups To Merge
    Aleri and Coral8 are hoping to take on much larger competitors such as IBM, Oracle, and Microsoft.
  • Tech Investing In The Downturn
    What does this mean for start-ups? It makes the job of a start-up harder. They used to have the opportunity to build a big company. That still may happen in a few cases, but it’s much more likely that start-ups will be sold into the value chain above them. In semiconductors, the chip companies are no longer in the business of integrating a lot of hot start-ups into their production flows. In the information technology stack, Oracle is integrating everything and leveraging customer relationships and the ability to deliver an IT experience, rather than a point tool.
  • Spotlight: Noosheen Hashemi, HAND Foundation
    Not that she didn’t love her job helping build Oracle into the world’s largest business software company. There were tremendous financial rewards. And not many people can say they were married at the home of Oracle CEO Larry Ellison. Noosheen and her husband, Zod Nazem, were married there in 1989. Perhaps the greatest benefit of the job for Hashemi was the financial freedom to follow her passions, so she decided to leave Oracle in 1995 and return to college to study business at Stanford. … Hashemi and her husband founded The HAND Foundation, a nonprofit organization that promotes development of the middle class as a way to encourage social stability and democracy, as well as prevention of child abuse. She also serves on the boards of a number of charitable groups and promotes greater philanthropic giving among Americans of Iranian descent.
  • Kirill Tatarinov: Microsoft’s Russian rocket
    But Kirill Tatarinov, the group’s leader since July 2007, said MBS brings more to the broader Microsoft than revenue from its Dynamics-branded systems, which manage a company’s customer relationships, suppliers, inventory and other business basics.
  • The new US CIO is a Google Apps kinda guy
    Check out the video of our CIO-in-chief, below extolling the virtues of google Apps:
  • Layoffs Are Cooling Down, At Least For Now
    Announcements of mass firings, buyouts and voluntary retirement offers have started tapering off. Here’s why. Last week, the Forbes.com Layoff Tracker counted a mere 6,000 layoffs announced at the 500 largest U.S.-based public companies, a far cry from the 20,000 to 90,000 in previous weeks. Maybe it’s time for some cautious optimism. Companies are still unloading thousands of employees. Many of the layoffs already announced won’t be completed until months or even years from now. But it’s still cheering news when the layoff storm lets up, even a little.
  • Web 2.0 Ad Supported Sites Will Fall Like Flies
    Ad supported web 2.0 properties are headed for a shakeout on a scale unseen since the dot.com bust. The theory was that the explosion of user-generated content would provide advertisers targeted opportunities but with online advertisers tightening their ad spend and moving to quality the future looks bleek.
  • Salesforce.com Smells Blood, Hunts Bigger CRM Prey: Enterprise Cloud Customers
    With the global economy in ruins, SaaS providers such as Salesforce.com are like a school of hungry sharks, eyeing the incumbent CRM, ERP, BI and supply chain vendors who’ve been wounded by persistent user complaints about high cost, enterprise application inflexibility and vendor lock-in fears, and are treading water as they chart their own uncertain direction. There’s blood in water. And Benioff is circling.
  • Microsoft adds board member, declares 13 cent per share quarterly dividend
    Her current research focuses on the development and use of multi-modal applications to assist people with aphasia and other cognitive impairments. Maria is a past president of the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) in New York, chair of the Board of Trustees of the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology in Palo Alto, and a trustee of the Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics in Los Angeles and the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute in Berkeley.
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